Badass Civil War Beards

This goes out to all of the brave men who fought to keep America united (or for the Confederacy, we don't judge) all while sporting sexy facial hair.

Aug 27
One of the many badass Civil War beards we’ve seen on this program!

One of the many badass Civil War beards we’ve seen on this program!


Burnsides (Remix)

Chapman Freeman has an interesting take on the Burnsides trend. It appears that he has forgone the portion that connects his hair to the rest of his facial hair. 


Facing the Enemy

Isaac Erwin Avery was known by some for his beard and by others for the note he scribbled as he lay dying on Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg. The short message he handed to his aide simply said, “Major, tell my father I died with my beard to the enemy. I. E. Avery.” Deep.


Aug 26

Smarty Pants

What about Henry Harrison Bingham doesn’t make him seem intelligent? His name, which is similar to a President, his sharp outfit, those glasses, that mustache, the fact that he was awarded a Medal of Honor…


I hope there were beards involved!

I hope there were beards involved!

(via huffingtonpostwomen)


Rum Jones

John Marshall Jones was killed while trying to restore order to his mustache troops at the battle of the Wilderness. They served him to the best of their abilities (his troops and his mustache, that is).


Aug 25

High-de Burns

Charles Croswell has sideburns, right? They look like they start so far up his face— well above his ears. 


usnatarchives:

We’re continuing our six weeks of style and moving on from the fashion of the Revolutionary War to the men and women of the nineteenth century.
Check out that beard and mustache! According to some historians, the hairy trend can be attributed to the popularization of Victorian ideals. Prominent facial hair was gradually considered to be an outward, physical expression of masculinity. If you want to learn more about this facial hair frenzy during the Civil War era, take a look at today’s Pieces of History post. Image: Gen. George S. Greene, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. National Archives Identifier: 527885.

usnatarchives:

We’re continuing our six weeks of style and moving on from the fashion of the Revolutionary War to the men and women of the nineteenth century.

Check out that beard and mustache! According to some historians, the hairy trend can be attributed to the popularization of Victorian ideals. Prominent facial hair was gradually considered to be an outward, physical expression of masculinity. If you want to learn more about this facial hair frenzy during the Civil War era, take a look at today’s Pieces of History post. Image: Gen. George S. Greene, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. National Archives Identifier: 527885.


Louisiana Tiger

Harry Thompson Hays? More like Hairy Thompson Hays, amirite? 


Aug 24
chubachus:

Second and more widely known view of a Union soldier from the 31st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment posing with his family in front of a tent as a few comrades are seen posing in the background which was taken near Fort Slocum in Washington, D.C., 1861. Animated stereoscopic photographs.
Source.
Second version.

chubachus:

Second and more widely known view of a Union soldier from the 31st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment posing with his family in front of a tent as a few comrades are seen posing in the background which was taken near Fort Slocum in Washington, D.C., 1861. Animated stereoscopic photographs.

Source.

Second version.


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